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Moulton Group PC specializes in the treatment of a variety of skin conditions including (but not limited):


Acne - Acne is the most common skin condition in the United States. Although it's common, accurate information about acne can be scarce. This can make it difficult to get clearer skin.


We treat acne because dermatologists know that letting acne runs its course is not always the best advice.
Without treatment, dark spots and permanent scars can appear on the skin as acne clears.
Treating acne often boosts a person’s self-esteem.
Many effective treatments are available and we can help you find the one that works best for you.

Nowadays, not just teens have acne. A growing number of women have acne in their 30s, 40s, 50s, and beyond. Dermatologists are not sure why this is happening. But dermatologists understand that adult acne can be particularly frustrating.



Athlete's Foot - Despite the name, athlete’s foot can happen to anyone. It is a common fungal infection that most people get from walking barefoot in moist, public places like a swimming pool deck or locker room. Athlete’s foot can result in flaky skin, cracking, and itchiness on the soles of the foot and between the toes.



Dandruff - Dandruff is produced when the skin of the scalp exfoliates excessively.
The white dusty flakes of material in the hair and on the shoulders are fragments of the superficial stratum corneum.
Lack of shampooing can enhance dandruff by allowing flakes to accumulate on the hair.
There are a number of scalp diseases than can produce dandruff.


Dandruff is a sign that the skin of the scalp is peeling off (exfoliating). It is perfectly normal for the skin to exfoliate. The problem arises when the amount of dandruff becomes an eyesore. There are basically two reasons for this. Too much production or not effective removal. In the too much production category are inflammatory diseases of the scalp. In the ineffective removal category is inadequate scalp hygienic efforts.



Eczema- Eczema is a term for a group of medical conditions that cause the skin to become inflamed or irritated. The most common type of eczema is known as atopic dermatitis, or atopic eczema. Atopic refers to a group of diseases with an often inherited tendency to develop other allergic conditions, such as asthma and hay fever.

Eczema affects about 10% to 20% of infants and about 3% of adults and children in the U.S. Most infants who develop the condition outgrow it by their tenth birthday, while some people continue to have symptoms on and off throughout life. With proper treatment, the disease often can be controlled.



Folliculitis - If you have sore red bumps that look like pimples, especially where you shave, you may have folliculitis, a common skin problem.

Hair follicles are tiny pockets in your skin. You have them just about everywhere except for your lips, your palms, and the soles of your feet. If you get bacteria or a blockage in a follicle, it may become red and swollen.

You can get this condition anywhere you have hair, but it’s most likely to show up on your neck, thighs, buttocks, or armpits. You can often treat it yourself, but for more severe cases you may need to make an appointment.

Different kinds of folliculitis have other names you might have heard, such as:
Barber’s itch
Hot tub rash
Razor bumps
Shaving rash



Fungal Nails - fungal nail infection occurs when a fungus attacks a fingernail, a toenail, or the skin under the nail, called the nail bed. Fungi (plural of fungus) can attack your nails through small cuts in the skin around your nail or through the opening between your nail and nail bed.


A fungal nail infection could lead to more serious problems if you have diabetes or a weak immune system. Talk to your doctor about the best way to treat a nail infection if you have one of these problems.



Hives- are raised red bumps on the skin most often caused by an allergic reaction. Hives usually cause itching, but may also burn or sting. They can appear anywhere on the body, including the face, lips, tongue, throat, or ears. Hives vary in size (from the size of a pencil eraser to that of a dinner plate), and may join together to form larger areas known as plaques. Occasionally, hives can signal more serious problems, especially when accompanied by symptoms such as difficult breathing.



Hyperhidrosis or excessive sweating  - is a common disorder which produces a lot of unhappiness. An estimated 2%-3% of Americans suffer from excessive sweating of the underarms (axillary hyperhidrosis) or of the palms and soles of the feet (palmoplantar hyperhidrosis). Underarm problems tend to start in late adolescence, while palm and sole sweating often begins earlier, around age 13 (on the average). Untreated, these problems may continue throughout life.



Poison Ivy - is a type of plant that can cause a skin rash called allergic contact dermatitis when it touches your skin. The red, uncomfortable, and itchy rash often shows up in lines or streaks and is marked by fluid-filled bumps (blisters) or large raised areas (hives). The poison ivy plant contains a type of oil, called urushiol, that can trigger an allergic reaction when it comes in to direct or indirect contact with the skin. So even if you don't directly touch the plant, you can still be exposed if you touch something that has the oil on it, such as a pet's fur or gardening tools. Not everyone who touches the oil will develop poison ivy. You must be sensitized to the oil in order to be affected.



Psoriasis- It's easy to think of psoriasis as just a "skin condition." But psoriasis actually starts underneath the skin. It is a chronic (long-lasting) disease of the immune system that can range from mild to severe.


Like most chronic illnesses, psoriasis may be associated with other health conditions such as psoriatic arthritis, Type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.


There are available treatment options and strategies that can help you live well with psoriasis. Start here by learning as much as you can about psoriasis and exploring it from the inside out.



Rosacea (rose-AY-sha) is a common skin disease. It often begins with a tendency to blush or flush more easily than other people.
The redness can slowly spread beyond the nose and cheeks to the forehead and chin. Even the ears, chest, and back can be red all the time.

Rosacea can cause more than redness. There are so many signs and symptoms that rosacea has four subtypes:
Erythematotelangiectatic rosacea: Redness, flushing, visible blood vessels.
Papulopustular rosacea: Redness, swelling, and acne-like breakouts.
Phymatous rosacea: Skin thickens and has a bumpy texture.
Ocular rosacea: Eyes red and irritated, eyelids can be swollen, and person may have what looks like a sty.  



Shingles (also called herpes zoster) -
Anyone who has had chickenpox can get shingles. After the chickenpox clears, the virus stays in the body. If the virus reactivates (wakes up), the result is shingles — a painful, blistering rash.

Shingles is most common in older adults. A vaccine, which can prevent shingles, is available to people ages 50 and older. Dermatologists recommend this vaccine for everyone 50 and older.

If you get shingles, an anti-viral medicine can make symptoms milder and shorter. The medicine may even prevent long-lasting nerve pain. Anti-viral medicine is most effective when started within 3 days of seeing the rash.



Skin Cancers - There are three major types of skin cancers: basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and melanoma. The first two skin cancers are grouped together as non-melanoma skin cancers. Other unusual types of skin cancer include Merkel cell tumors and dermatofibrosarcoma protruberans.


These are the basics on skin cancers:

The vast majority of skin cancers are basal cell carcinomas and squamous cells carcinomas. While malignant, these are unlikely to spread to other parts of the body. They may be locally disfiguring if not treated early.

A small but significant number of skin cancers are malignant melanomas. Malignant melanoma is a highly aggressive cancer that tends to spread to other parts of the body. These cancers may be fatal if not treated early.

Like many cancers, skin cancers start as precancerous lesions. These precancerous lesions are changes in skin that are not cancer, but could become cancer over time. Medical professionals often refer to these changes as dysplasia. Some specific dysplastic changes that occur in skin are as follows:

Actinic keratosis is an area of red or brown, scaly, rough skin, which can develop into squamous cell carcinoma.

A nevus is a mole, and abnormal moles are called dysplastic nevi. These can potentially develop into melanoma over time.
Moles are simply growths on the skin that rarely develop into cancer. Most people have 10 to 30 moles on their body that can be identified as flat or raised, smooth on the surface, round or oval in shape, pink, tan, brown or skin-colored, and no larger than a quarter-inch across. If a mole on your body looks different from the others, ask your health care provider to take a look at it.
Dysplastic nevi, or abnormal moles, are not cancer, but they can become cancer. People sometimes have as many as 100 or more dysplastic nevi, which are usually irregular in shape, with notched or fading borders. Some may be flat or raised, and the surface may be smooth or rough ("pebbly"). They are often large, at a quarter-inch across or larger, and are typically of mixed color, including pink, red, tan, and brown.



Warts - Warts are benign (not cancerous) skin growths that appear when a virus infects the top layer of the skin. Viruses that cause warts are called human papillomavirus (HPV). You are more likely to get one of these viruses if you cut or damage your skin in some way.

Wart viruses are contagious. Warts can spread by contact with the wart or something that touched the wart.

Warts are often skin-colored and feel rough, but they can be dark (brown or gray-black), flat, and smooth.